The Case for Inclusive Psalmody

Psalm 121 & others

By Arnfield P. Cudal

Because psalm-singing was not a tradition in the evangelical church I grew up in, my encounter with singing the Psalms seemed like a novelty at first, but as appreciation and familiarity in singing the Psalms grew, it has come to be one of the more anticipated and endearing moments in our gatherings. Churches of various denominations and traditions read the Psalms, or sing portions in hymns and choir anthems, but what I am referring to is singing of the Psalms in its entirety, by whole verse and chapter.

If you haven’t participated in whole verse singing or attend a church where psalm-singing is not normally practiced, it is hoped that this article will at least stoke a renewed interest in the Psalms, and to introduce the joys of whole-psalm singing to your congregation. The beauty of psalm-singing is that it transcends all denominations and traditions.

Beyond my personal appeal, however, the reasons for psalm-singing are more convincing from Scripture…
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Rethinking Music and Worship

By Arnfield P. Cudal

Worship in the church has come to indicate that corporate act of adoration whereby music is the modality in which love, honor, and adoration to God is expressed. We associate music with “worship,” and the question here is not so much whether music is an appropriate vehicle of expression (music should be more appropriately referred as “praise”), but church music today has been given roles and functions which were never intended. When music has become sacramental and assumed the role of mediator (“music draws us into the presence of Jesus”), evangelizer (“reach people with our music”), and witness (“they’ll know us by our music”), the outcome is an idolization of the music above the Word, and the usurpation of the ministry of the Gospel and the Holy Spirit…
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What are the spiritual songs of the Bible and why do we need to know them?

By Arnfield P. Cudal

Having read Rob Slane’s article, “Why the church needs to sing the Psalms,” and the article, “Why the church needs to sing (or a least speak) the Hymns,” the answer to the next question, “What are spiritual songs?” becomes more needful. The question now is not about whether these spiritual songs are from the Bible, since it has been determined that they are Scripture, but like the psalms and the hymns, we want to know what and where they are and what purpose they serve? … Continue Reading >


 

Why the Church needs to sing (or at least, speak) the Hymns of the Bible

The Hymn of 1st Peter

By Arnfield P. Cudal
This is written in response to Rob Slane’s article “Why the Church needs to sing the Psalms,” published by Samaritan Ministries.

The Bible is full of sanction and exhortation when it comes to singing the Psalms. “Sing to Him, sing psalms to Him; talk ye of all His wondrous works” (Psalm 105:2); and “Is any merry? Let him sing psalms” (James 5:13). The passages in Colossians and Ephesians give reason as to why: “let the Word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom” (Colossians 3:16), and “be not drunk with wine…but be filled with the Spirit” (Ephesians 5:18). And because we know the Psalms are God’s Word, it is “profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness” (2 Timothy 3:16). Therefore, the case for including the Psalms in our singing (Inclusive Psalmody) is Biblically encouraged and justified.

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 Psalm 23

(in Thai, praised to Thai classical music)

Psalm 122

(in Thai, praised to Thai classical music)

Psalm 37

(in Anglican chant)



 

 

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